BURIED TREASURE

About thirty years ago record producer Tommy Vicari (Taste of Honey, Billy Idol, Prince) recorded and produced an album with Frank Musker, Elizabeth Lamers, Jeff Hull and Marty Walsh – four good friends who were hot songwriters, singers, and musicians working at that time in the LA music scene of 1989. They called themselves ‘World Goes Round’. Between them they had either written for, sung with or played on records by a string of major artists and producers like Linda Ronstadt, Queen, Chaka Khan, Brenda Russell, Jeffrey Osborne, John Denver, Supertramp, John Fogerty, Quincy Jones, Arif Mardin, Air Supply – the list is too long to quote in full.

Like Fleetwood Mac and The Eurythmics, there was romance at the heart of the band. Frank and Elizabeth’s relationship started as a love affair before mellowing into a creative force, which yielded the unforgettable hit song they wrote together with Brian May of Queen, “Too Much Love Will Kill You”. The composition was a global hit, winning a coveted Ivor Novello Award in the UK for ‘best song musically and lyrically’.

At Frankie’s home studio in legendary Laurel Canyon (with a 150ft California redwood growing out of the middle of it), World Goes Round wrote and recorded their tracks, including the prescient ecological anthem “Big House” (now brought to life with an exciting contemporary 21st century video). In this idyllic, pressure free setting they came up with some astoundingly great music which matched their creative and musical aspirations – to make a record that was musically up there with their heroes but quirky, forthright, opinionated and relevant. Hip but accessible at the same time. Many of the lyrical themes are more topical now than in 1989. Yet the music captures the spirit of that momentous time.

For one reason or another, both personal and contractual, these golden World Goes Round tracks have languished unheard for thirty years. Finally the shackles are off and they can be heard by the world. World Goes Round (WGR) is the name of the super band that never was. After thirty years these tracks sound as fresh and current now as they did then. Maybe better. Perhaps WGR was ahead of its time. Or they’ve just improved like good wine. Either way there is more of the story to come. Stay tuned.

© 2020 World Goes Round

Photo Roberto Nickson